Ampere A. TSENG, Miroslav RAUDENSKY; Meat consumption and its impact on greenhouse gas emissions from group of twenty (G20) and the world; Recent Advances in Food Science; 2018; 1(1): 11-22

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Ampere A. TSENG, Miroslav RAUDENSKY; Meat consumption and its impact on greenhouse gas emissions from group of twenty (G20) and the world; Recent Advances in Food Science; 2018; 1(1): 11-22

Correlation formulas are developed to estimate the dietary and total greenhouse gas emissions (GHGEs) from the twenty members of the Group of Twenty (G20) and the world in 2014 and 2017 using personal meat consumption as the required input. Among the 43 states in G20, the 28 states of the European Union (EU28) are considered as a whole. Based on 47,381 dietary survey samples, a formula is developed to establish the relationship between the meat consumption and GHGEs from human dietary and total activities. The present study finds that, in 2014, the daily dietary GHGE per capita of the G20 members varies widely from India’s 4.122 kgCO2e to Australia’s 8.876 kgCO2e while the contribution of the dietary GHGE to the total GHGE differs from Canada’s 11.8% to India’s 60.8%, where the world average is 33.1%. From 2014 to 2017, the annual growth rate of the total GHGE varies from 0.016% in Japan to 3.279% in Saudi Arabia. All results attest that there is a substantial room for the huge dietary and total emitters to improve their efforts in reducing GHGEs. Correlation formulas are developed to estimate dietary and total greenhouse-gas emissions. The dietary and total greenhouse-gas emissions of the G20 and the world in 2014 and 2017 are evaluated.  The formulas predicate that the global total GHGEs increase monotonically from 50,686 GtCO2e in 2017 to 55.159 GtCO2e in 2025, respectively. It has been shown that these formulas could provide benchmark information for developing strategies for reducing GHGEs in order to mitigate global warming problems.